Apr
25
Wed
Medicine Grand Rounds: Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Medicine, Why, What and How? @ LKSC, Berg Hall
Apr 25 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am
Medicine Grand Rounds: Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Medicine, Why, What and How? @ LKSC, Berg Hall | Palo Alto | California | United States

Presenter: Jonathan Chen, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Informatics
Stanford University

Jonathan H Chen MD, PhD is a physician-scientist with professional software development experience and graduate training in computer science. He continues to practice Internal Medicine for the concrete rewards of caring for real people and to inspire his research focused on mining clinical data sources to inform medical decision making.

Chen co-founded a company to translate his Computer Science graduate work into an expert system to solve organic chemistry problems, with applications from drug discovery to a practical education tool distributed to students across the world. To gain first-hand perspective in tackling the greater societal problems in health care, he completed medical training in Internal Medicine and a VA Research Fellowship in Medical Informatics. He has published influential work in venues including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, JAMA Internal Medicine, Bioinformatics, Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, and the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, with research awards and recognition from the NIH Big Data 2 Knowledge initiative, National Library of Medicine, American Medical Informatics Association, Yearbook of Medical Informatics, and American College of Physicians, among others.

In the face of ever escalating complexity in medicine, integrating informatics solutions is the only credible approach to systematically address challenges in healthcare. Tapping into real-world clinical data streams like electronic medical records with machine learning and data analytics will reveal the community’s latent knowledge in a reproducible form. Delivering this back to clinicians, patients, and healthcare systems as clinical decision support will uniquely close the loop on a continuously learning health system. Dr. Chen’s group seeks to empower individuals with the collective experience of the many, combining human and artificial intelligence approaches to medicine that will deliver better care than what either can do alone.

Refer to Dr. Chen’s web-page for additional in-depth bio information, publication lists, CV, etc.
http://web.stanford.edu/~jonc101

Apr
26
Thu
BMIR Research In Progress: Francesco Vallania “Single-Cell Chromatin Modification Profiling Reveals Increased Epigenetic Variations With Aging” @ MSOB, Conference Room X-275
Apr 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

francesco-vallania 2

Francesco Vallania,
Postdoctoral Scholar,
ITI, Stanford University

ABSTRACT:
Post-translational modifications of histone proteins and exchanges of histone variants at chromatin are central to the regulation of nearly all DNA-based biological processes. However, the degree and variability of chromatin modifications in specific human immune cells remain largely unknown. Here, we present a highly multiplexed mass cytometry analysis to profile the global levels of a broad array of chromatin modifications in primary human immune cells at the single-cell level. Our data reveal markedly different cell type- and hematopoietic lineage-specific chromatin modification patterns. Differential analysis between younger and older adults shows that aging is associated with increased heterogeneity between individuals and elevated cell-to-cell variability in chromatin modifications. Analysis of a twin cohort unveils heritability of chromatin modifications and demonstrates that aging-related chromatin alterations are predominantly driven by non-heritable influences. We present a powerful platform for chromatin and immunology research. Our discoveries highlight the profound impacts of aging on chromatin modifications.