Feb
15
Tue
PHIND Seminar: Assessing the Effects of Alternative Plant-Based Meats vs. Animal Meats on Biomarkers of Inflammation: A Secondary Analysis of the SWAP-MEAT Randomized Crossover Trial @ Zoom - See Description for Zoom Link
Feb 15 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
PHIND Seminar: Assessing the Effects of Alternative Plant-Based Meats vs. Animal Meats on Biomarkers of Inflammation: A Secondary Analysis of the SWAP-MEAT Randomized Crossover Trial @ Zoom - See Description for Zoom Link

PHIND Seminar Series: Sensor systems to predict, prevent and cure cardiovascular disease
11:00am – 12:00pm Seminar & Discussion
RSVP Here

Zoom Webinar Details
Webinar URL: . https://stanford.zoom.us/s/95966150853
Dial: US: +1 650 724 9799  or +1 833 302 1536 (Toll Free)
Webinar ID: 959 6615 0853
Passcode: 253543

 

Anthony Crimarco, PhD
Research Program Manager
Menus of Change University Research Collaborative (MCRUC)
Stanford University

 

Abstract
Background: To conduct a secondary analysis of Stanford University’s Study With Appetizing Plantfood – Meat Eating Alternatives Trial (SWAP-MEAT) by assessing the effects of consuming plant-based meats versus animal meats on biomarkers of inflammation (clinical trials.gov registry: NCT03718988). We hypothesized that biomarkers of inflammation would be improved for the plant-based meats compared to the animal meats.

Methods: SWAP-MEAT was a randomized crossover trial that involved participants eating 2 or more servings of plant-based meats for 8 weeks (i.e. Plant-based phase) followed by 2 or more servings of animal meats for 8 weeks (i.e. Animal phase) or vice versa. Participants’ biomarkers of inflammation were assessed from blood samples collected every 2 weeks in the intervention. Using the Olink platform, changes in 92 biomarkers of inflammation were compared between baseline and the end of each dietary phase (week 8 and 16). Linear mixed effect models were conducted to assess if the changes were significantly different for the Plant phase compared to the Animal phase.

Results: A total of 36 participants completed the intervention and provided complete data. They were 67% women, 69% Caucasian, had an average age of 50±14 years and body mass index (BMI) of 28±5 kg/m2. The results of the linear mixed effect models indicated only 4 out of the 92 biomarkers reached statistical significance.

Conclusions: The results were contrary to our hypothesis, since we expected relative improvements in biomarkers of inflammation during the Plant-based phase. It is possible that 8 weeks of reducing animal meat consumption are not enough to observe any significant improvements in systemic inflammation or that plant-based meat products themselves are not sufficient enough to improve inflammation compared to an overall, healthy plant-based dietary pattern.

 

About Anthony Crimarco
Anthony Crimarco is a Research Program Manager for Stanford University’s Menus of Change University Research Collaborative (MCRUC). His focus area of research includes diet and lifestyle interventions; the benefits of plant-based diets; and mHealth and eHealth. Dr. Crimarco received his Ph.D. in Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior at the University of South Carolina in 2019 and completed a T-32 Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Stanford Prevention Research Center in 2021.

 

 

Hosted by: Garry Gold, MD
Sponsored by: PHIND Center & the Department of Radiology